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What YOU can do when Ron Paul has a money bomb

May 30, 2011 2 comments

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So you’ve heard that Congressman Ron Paul is having a money bomb to support his 2012 presidential campaign. You know that Ron Paul is the only serious presidential candidate who has opposed the Iraq War from the beginning, and that he correctly predicted President Obama’s lies about Iraq. Lately you’ve been learning more about his efforts to audit the Federal Reserve, and you’re starting to understand the connections between bad monetary policy and rising food and gas prices. Moreover, you have a friend who was hassled by the police for a drug-related issue even though your friend never hurt anyone, and so Ron Paul’s staunch opposition to federal drug policies really hits home with you. Bit by bit you’ve grown to realize that this guy just makes sense, and you think he has the potential to help America adopt more sensible policies, making us simultaneously freer and safer. You want to help him on that journey – but how?

1. DON’T donate immediately.
That’s right, I don’t want you to jump right into giving money to Ron Paul’s campaign. There’s a lot more to winning an election than just getting money, and there’s a lot more to achieving liberty than just winning an election. Besides, money is tight for all of us these days, and if you’re a college student or between jobs, the last thing we need is for you to go hog-wild with electioneering and wind up discouraged and short on cash. Your money is your own – keep it until you have made a sound decision to spend it.

2. Get educated and motivated.
Liberty doesn’t come from politicians, and it certainly doesn’t come from ignorance. In order to make the most of your work with the liberty movement, you should view every campaign as an opportunity to learn about the issues. Fortunately Ron Paul is very concerned about openness in government and helping to educate the populace, so his political positions are well-documented here and also here. I’ll list just a few highlights you might find interesting.

  • Paul’s stance on foreign policy is one of consistent non-intervention, opposing war of aggression and entangling alliances with other nations.
  • His warnings of impending economic crisis and a loss of confidence in the dollar in 2005 and 2006 were at the time derided by many economists, but accelerating dollar devaluation in 2007 led experts like former Federal Reserve chair Alan Greenspan to reconsider hard money policies such as those of Paul.
  • Paul broke with his party by voting against the PATRIOT Act in 2001; he also voted against its 2005 enactment.
  • Paul supports the right of those who engage in nonviolent resistance when they believe a law is unjust, bringing up the names of Martin Luther King, Lysander Spooner, and Mahatma Gandhi as examples of practitioners of peaceful civil disobedience.
  • He believes the internet should be free from government regulation and taxation.
  • [Paul is] the only 2008 presidential candidate to earn Gun Owners of America’s A+ rating.
  • Paul stated that he supported the right of gay couples to marry, so long as they didn’t “impose” their relationship on anyone else.
  • Paul has called for passage of tax relief bills to reduce health care costs for families.
  • Paul contends that prohibition of drugs is ineffective and advocates ending the War on Drugs.

Now that you have learned a bit more about Ron Paul’s positions or taken a refresher course if you are a seasoned supporter, you should also watch a couple of videos to remind yourself why the issues of liberty are so important, and why Ron Paul is often considered the leading advocate for liberty in the modern political scene. Fortunately there are a vast array of well-made videos about Ron Paul and his courageous campaign to restore freedom in America. I humbly submit a few suggestions of my own, of which you might pick one or two to watch.

One of the best things you can do for the liberty movement right now, if you like these videos, is to simply send one or two of them to a friend of yours who isn’t already familiar with the ideas of liberty. You don’t need to be pushy or preachy – spreading liberty can be as simple as saying, “Hey, I saw this video and found it really interesting, so I thought I’d pass it along.” This is exactly how philosophies spread.

The last thing you need to do before you are prepared to take financial action in defense of liberty is to increase your knowledge on the day-to-day news of how government is affecting our lives in negative ways right now. Again there are fantastic resources available to you to do this. Maybe you don’t read articles on politics too often, but that’s why you should consider Ron Paul’s money bomb as a special opportunity to get involved in new ways. Try reading one article from the front page of LewRockwell.com, Antiwar.com, or the Mises blog. Just one or two articles is all it takes, and in ten minutes or so you can gain valuable new insight into the political issues that affect our country today. Remember, don’t be afraid to send these articles to friends if you find them genuinely interesting or know someone who would.

3. Donate a reasonable amount of money to Ron Paul’s campaign.
Ah yes, we’re finally at that step. You need to decide how much money you want to give to Ron Paul’s money bomb to help him advertise and get more attention in his battle for freedom. Take into consideration your personal financial situation, and remember that the number of people who donate to the money bomb matters at least as much as the total monetary amount. Ron Paul wants sincere support from every-day people, not big checks from special interest groups. This means that it’s completely fair to say no donation is too small, and you should never refrain from donating just because you don’t have much to offer. If you are a college student, ten or twenty dollars is a very reasonable donation to make. If you have a steady income, maybe you want to put down fifty or a hundred. I would never suggest that you give more than you feel comfortable giving, because that will only result in disillusionment and resentment in the long term. But you should give at least a bit if you possibly can, because the more donors Ron Paul has, the more his campaign staff can assess his support throughout the nation and the harder it gets for media outlets to ignore his message. So go on and click this link to send Ron Paul whatever spare funds you have to offer, and help the message of liberty reach more people.

4. Ask your friends to donate as well.
This step is intimidating for a lot of people, but it really should not be. You have earned the right to politely ask for contributions from your friends, because you have given money yourself. You are not just blindly telling people to fork over their hard-earned cash to some guy on the internet. You have investigated his positions, read up on the issues, and even put your own money where your mouth is. It’s not at all out of line to remind any Ron Paul-supporting friends you may have that today is a great day for them to help out, nor is it unusual to make a personal request to people outside the movement that they look into Ron Paul’s campaign. You can think of this as asking for a favor. After all, you care about liberty, and your friends won’t mind you making a genuine request regarding something that’s important to you. So go ahead – you made a donation to prove your dedication, now spread the word about the money bomb to as many people as you can.

Congratulations on participating in your first Ron Paul money bomb, and thank you for supporting the liberty movement! Rational individuals need upstanding people like you to pitch in to build a society based on voluntary associations, free thought, and free markets. I welcome your continued participation in our righteous campaign.

 


 

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Stop Corporate Charity

December 29, 2010 2 comments

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There are many reasons to oppose corporate charity. It is deceptive, immoral, and border-line criminal. It hinders economic growth for the wealthy as well as the impoverished, and promotes a culture of ambiguity, pompous grandstanding, and anti-productivity.

Under a strict construction of the ethics of contractual agreements, corporate charity is an act of theft against the corporation’s stockholders and other investors. This is obviously so because a corporation is by definition a for-profit entity, and its investors lend their capital to the corporation ostensibly to receive a return on investment in proportion to the corporation’s profits. Investment carries risk, of course, and if a corporation fails to produce a profit by the honest inadequacies of its executives, that is business. On the other hand, if it fails to produce a profit – or fails to produce as much of a profit – because the executives made a decision to donate some portion of revenue to charity, however small a portion it may be, the investors have been cheated out of returns they were owed under their agreement with the corporation. This is exactly the same crime as occurs when executives defraud investors by embezzling company funds into their personal accounts. It is only treated differently because of differing public attitudes about perceived greed and perceived charity, which, right or wrong, should have no bearing on whether theft is a crime.

An argument can be made that the situation is not so clear-cut because corporate charity has gained widespread acceptance, or at least widespread acknowledgment. Since almost all corporations engage in at least some level of charity, it could be argued that investors understand at the time they decide to purchase stocks that some portion of their funds will be given away rather than used for real investment purposes. That’s not a totally invalid point, but it’s extremely shaky. If a consumer buys a sealed box labeled “a dozen eggs”, but knows at the time it probably only contains ten eggs because a short dozen scam is widespread and typical in his town, the fact that he knew he was most likely getting scammed doesn’t make the scam okay. This is what is happening with corporate charity: investors are being scammed out of a portion of their investment, but they expect they probably will be. That doesn’t justify it.

Furthermore, even if we accept the argument that an expected scam is not truly a scam, that leaves open the question of precisely what is expected. Maybe investors only expect that the corporations in which they choose to invest will donate one percent of their money, but the corporations actually donate two percent! Maybe the investors expect that each corporation will steal whatever the average amount of stealing is, but in fact some corporations by definition must steal more than the average. Clearly there is no way to reason out of the reality that deliberately non-profit actions by an explicitly for-profit institution is a criminal act of theft against investors. This alone should be sufficient to compel any honest person to oppose all corporate charity.

This is nowhere near the end of it, though. As with almost all criminal acts, the damage done by corporate charity really extends far beyond the simple breaking of an abstract principle. The principles of contracts exist for a reason, and the violation of them has severe negative consequences for everyone. When executives steal from investors to donate to charities, they decompartmentalize the economy, blurring the lines between production and consumption, and making it harder for investors as well as consumers to make informed choices. Compartmentalization and specialization are necessary in a productive society, because they allow for the greatest success for the most productive entities and the most immediate failure for the unproductive ones. Both production and charity are made more efficient when they are handled separately.

Consider an entrepreneur who innovates in automobile technology, reducing the costs of high-speed transportation sufficiently that millions of families who were previously too poor to afford it now have access. Good for him. His company will likely make a very large amount of money selling these cheaper automobiles, and it should, because that profit is the incentive that brings about innovation. It’s a reciprocal relationship – the entrepreneur is wealthier precisely because he made poor people wealthier. The more people to whom he is able to provide transportation affordably, the more money he will have. In this way he has done a great service to himself as well as to others around him.

Now suppose this entrepreneur donates huge portions of his money to charity, or worse, steals from the investors in his company and donates their money to charity. No matter what sociology professors may say, this is economically a bad idea. It is known that the entrepreneur is talented in production. There is no reason to believe he is talented in charity. He has an inarguable eye for opportunity in investment. He may very well be no more competent than any other bloke when it comes to giving aid. In reality, it is almost assuredly true that he would do a far greater service to the poor – which is to say, would raise their standard of living by a far higher amount – if he would use this money to reinvest in research and development to continue to make his automobiles more affordable, or to add new safety features, or to market a line of trucks, or whatever else he discerns is a wise productive investment. Remember that, if he sells a million automobiles a year, then for every dollar by which he is able to reduce the price of his automobiles the poorer people save a million dollars. Simultaneously, his sales will increase, so he will become richer, and have more money to reinvest. That’s economics, and it works.

When entrepreneurs reinvest accumulated capital and thereby lower the cost of consumer goods, they have another effect which is even more profound. By raising the ratio of value produced to labor required, investors raise real wages for just about everyone. This means that while people need to pay less money at the store to get the things that they want, they also take home more money from their standard day job. That’s a compelling argument against corporate charity and for corporate investment from the standpoint of the working class people. As for those who are too uneducated, disabled, or disinterested to labor for a living, the argument is – believe it or not – even stronger. That’s because it is an empirically demonstrable fact that donations by ordinary people to private charities actually rise super-linearly with income. This means when people make more money, they give even more of the money they make to charity. Thus, a successful investment in research and development will in the long run raise charitable donations more than if the same amount of money were simply given directly to charities – and yet it will do so without the need for criminal deception and the taking of other people’s money. So why don’t these do-gooder corporate executives who want to help the poor start by helping their employees and stockholders, and let people donate to charity with their own money?

One can speculate further that there is yet another mechanism by which corporate charity ultimately reduces charitable contributions, and that mechanism is uncertainty and lack of information. It is assuredly true that, when people donate to charity, they value knowledge of where their money is going, and want to know that it is being used effectively. They want to know how much of their income they donate, and smoke and mirrors surrounding charity will cause skepticism. It is therefore very likely that corporations which engage in charity using money taken from investors without their direct knowledge or consent really discourage other people from donating explicitly and thus reduce total donations. In much the same way that people tend to avoid taking it upon themselves to help the unemployed and homeless when governments claim to provide protection, so also they probably scale back charitable donations when corporations claim to do it for them. This reduction in charity is perception-based, not results-based. So when governments and corporations fail to provide the benefits they claim, and the downtrodden are left to suffer, nevertheless members of the community do not respond, do not take up the burden of charity themselves, because they are told someone else is taking care of it, so it must be someone else’s fault. A mixture of pathological blaming and self-righteous grandstanding takes the place of real work by individuals to help their fellow men, and everyone is worse off.

Finally, corporate charity is used as a rationalization for bad corporate policy, rent-seeking, interference with public policy and government officials, and generally poor quality of products and services. It tends to be a last-ditch effort by inefficient executives to avoid the progress inherent in a free market. Suppose one company is able to sell a product for ninety dollars, while another sells it for the slightly higher price of one hundred dollars, but has a better reputation due to engaging in more charitable programs in local communities. That sounds nice, but almost certainly the latter company’s contributions really do not constitute ten percent of its revenue. Therefore, consumers would do better to buy the cheaper product from the less charitable company and donate just some of the money they save. Some of them will do this, but others will make the mistake of falling victim to feel-good reputation-building that obscures real market efficiency. A greater good is done for a greater number of people by pursuing the most efficient, not the most heartwarming economic goals.

Thus the executive who commandeers funds entrusted to him by others and uses them for his own purposes – even ostensibly charitable ones – is presented with an incentive structure which rewards grandstanding and hollow self-promotion, while the executive who commits the investors’ funds to their intended purpose is required to produce real benefits for the consumers in order to stay afloat. This leads us to a final and critical point which those of you who know me well may have realized was coming from the beginning: So-called corporate “charity” is not charity at all. It is avaricious crime which damages the people it claims to help and helps the people it claims to damage. Executives who presume to achieve moral superiority by being sacrificial with other people’s money are not generous; they are vicious. The particular charities which they happen to favor are deemed worthy of everyone else’s support. So if an executive happens to feel especially strongly about one kind of cancer because of a death in his family, others who suffer from a different cancer must see a loss in funding because the executive is quite happy to steal from the populace and redirect contributions to his favored cause. As a result, charity organizations focus less on creating real results which they can demonstrate to the average person and more on befriending the higher-ups. So-called corporate “charity” robs the investors who risked their money to support entrepreneurship, raises costs to consumers, lowers employee wages, corrupts charities, empowers executives to an even greater extent, and ultimately does exactly the opposite of its purported goal: getting money to charities to help people in need.


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Symbols of Freedom: Gadsden flag, circled “V” on Facebook, and more

August 12, 2010 15 comments

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A topic that comes up quite frequently in discussion of libertarianism, market anarchism, and other pro-freedom circles is the symbolism associated with the movement against socialism, tyranny, and government as a concept. What kinds of symbols do libertarians use? Where do they come from? How do I get that “V” in a circle on my Facebook page? These are all legitimate – and important – questions. To help shed some light, I’ve compiled a number of popular symbols of freedom on this blog and explained their origin, meaning, and use today. I will not focus so much on the classical depictions of liberty such as the cuneiform amagi or the lady Liberty herself but rather on the more recent images and characters which circulate the internet today, such as the gadsden flag, the circle v, etc.

The Gadsden Flag


What is its significance?

This flag has a rich history dating all the way back to Benjamin Franklin who in 1751 suggested the symbol of the rattlesnake to represent American resistance against the British crown. Franklin was explicit in his revolutionary beliefs long before revolution itself seemed a realistic possibility, and chose the rattlesnake for the contrast between its generally non-aggressive nature and its ability to be extremely, violently forceful when stepped upon. When the myriad personal and trading vessels that formed much of the U.S. navy began intercepting British warships, they flew a flag designed by Colonel Gadsden which depicted a rattlesnake and the words “DONT TREAD ON ME” to indicate their defiance of government control. This formed the basis for the modern day Gadsden flag which has seen huge popularity during the Tea Party protests of the late Bush administration and the Obama administration. It is in some sense a patriotic symbol by association with the the American revolution, but it also serves as an alternative for the many Tea Partiers who refuse to fly the Stars and Stripes for the appeasement of tyrants.

Should I use it?

Probably so! In terms of recognition and historical significance, nothing beats the Gadsden flag. By choosing to fly an American flag which is not, and has never been, a flag of any government, nor ever been used as a symbol of conquest and imperialism, you can send a clear message that you are not proud to be ruled by an institution of regulation, control, and abuse. The only negative to flying this flag is that, due to its extreme popularity, not everyone who has adopted it is actually consistent with the original message behind the flag. It is at its core a symbol of defense and defense alone.

What are some uses and variations?

The Gadsden flag’s primary use is as a physical flag displayed at Tea Party protests. It has also become very popular as a Facebook profile picture and a bumper sticker. It is frequently combined with the conventional anarcho-capitalist flag to produce the Gadsden anarchist flag. One of the most interesting variations I’ve seen is the three-dimensional Gadsden flag. Finally, there are an increasing number of tattoos depicting just the rattlesnake and the words “DONT TREAD ON ME.”

The Anarcho-Capitalist Flag


What is its significance?

This flag is really quite simple. All of the anarchist flags are split diagonally, black on one half and another color on the other. This descends from the pure black flag of anarchy – since black is the absence of any color, it follows that a black flag represents the absence of any government. Gold is the color of anarcho-capitalism as a symbol of the prosperity which invariably results when governments do not interfere with the voluntary exchange of goods. Due to its simple elegance and very well-defined message, the anarcho-capitalist flag is extremely popular.

Should I use it?

Definitely. This symbol is free of any ambiguity, as it has never been understood to represent anything other than total non-consent to all government control and an absolute respect for the rights of individuals to retain or trade their private property at will. However, there is one drawback. It lacks somewhat in recognition due to the fact that there are no out-of-the-closet anarchists in high public office or on mainstream networks.

What are some uses and variations?

It’s not too common to see this flag actually printed and flown, because anarchists typically do not see a need to fly flags. However, the image has been very popular on the internet as a base for all kinds of creative expansion. It’s so very simple, each anarchist wants to add an idea or message that he or she feels needs to be declared.

V for Vendetta


What is its significance?

Perhaps one of the most hotly-contested anarchist symbols, the circled “V” drawn in blood red against a black backdrop originates from the 1980’s series of comic books V for Vendetta. The symbol became wildly popular shortly after the release of the 2006 film by the same name. In both, the protagonist identifies by the name “V” and draws the circled letter to represent his anarchist cause in resistance against a fascist state. However, the message carried by V goes beyond one of vindication and as far as vindictiveness. He is frequently depicted using aggressive force against people who seem at most incidentally related to the fascist regime, especially in the movie. Nonetheless, V does express regret for the collateral damage he causes and states that he believed it to be necessary to achieve a freer society.

Should I use it?

That depends on how revolutionary you are. If you are a pure voluntaryist who objects on moral grounds to all aggressive force, you probably should not use this symbol, because the “Vendetta” part of “V for Vendetta” clearly refers to a violent revolution with collateral damage. On the other hand, if you see freeing society from its tyrannical government to be a paramount goal towards which all feasible methods must be employed, this may be the best symbol for you. It certainly does have very high recognition and an umbrella of coverage due to including both anarcho-capitalists anarcho-socialists.

What are some uses and variations?

The circled “V” is sometimes drawn on protest signs along with the anarchist clenched fist to stand out from a crowd as opposing both “sides” of a political issue. The Guy Fawkes mask worn by V is also popular to wear to protests because it protects the identity of the anarchist. This, however, can lead to police becoming agitated for no good reason.

V for Voluntary


What is its significance?

This image was created just a few short years ago by a passionate libertarian after the “V for Vendetta” film was released, and it has taken off like a rocket. Its success can be attributed to the elaborate amount of thought and attention to detail in what appears at first to be a remarkably simple design. The “V” is split into half gold and half black with the anarcho-capitalist flag in mind. However, instead of simply depicting a split or divison as both the letter “V” and the anarcho-capitalist flag do, V for Voluntary actually joins back together at the top to complete a circle, representing the unity and cohesion that follows from a non-violent society. Most impressively, the joining of prosperity with anarchy is actually a handshake – the gold side folds over the black side as two hands gripping one another, which draws attention to the literal contract theory of a capitalist society and also to the brotherly harmony of voluntaryist thought. Thus the ultimate message conveyed by V for Voluntary is “In freedom, people become united and prosperous.”

Should I use it?

I can’t think of any good reason not to. It does not have extremely widespread recognition due to having been created just a few years ago, but voluntarism is a growing philosophy and you can help it along.

What are some uses and variations?

Profile pictures! Probably the best way to help others understand the message of freedom is to utilize social networking, both in the literal sense of sharing content with friends and also by highlighting similarities between libertarian thought and people’s personal views. Voluntarism is the perfect path for this because the right to make choices without being forcibly controlled is valued by many people who are not politically active. The purity of this message also makes V for Voluntary tattoos a good choice for the long run.

Circled “V” and circled “A” characters


What is its significance?

This topic amuses me because it draws the plurality of all searches to my blog. The presence of circled “V” and circled “A” on Facebook names recently has caused quite a stir. They are gaining rapid popularity as more and more young people have come to realize that the government cannot be trusted to give them happy lives. The “V” stands for “voluntary” and the “A” for anarchy, with all the usual implications of those words.

Should I use it?

As long as you are comfortable sharing your political views on Facebook, go for it. It will probably get some attention from your friends and will allow other freedom advocates to identify you on community pages. You may get some random friend requests from people you don’t know who also bear the symbols, but that can be fun and informative.

How do I get the circled “V” or circled “A” on my Facebook page?

These characters are Unicode 9398 and 9419. In case you don’t know what that means, just copy and paste them from here: Ⓥ Ⓐ

From your Facebook home page, click on “Account” and select “Account Settings.” Find where it says “Name” and click “change.” Add the character of your choice to the end of your name and click “Change Name.” Voila! You are now a certified freedom advocate.

So which ones do you use?

I use the Gadsden flag and the circled “V” symbol on Facebook. I haven’t found anything creative to do with any of the others yet, but I may eventually get a V for Voluntary tattoo when I have way too much time and money.


If you liked this post, please share it on your Twitter or Facebook page. You may also like Gadsden and American flags merged in public domain. Check out the index page for more from the Worst-Case Scenario!

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Tea Party Plans for Success at 912 Protests in 2010

July 14, 2010 1 comment

This year’s 912 protests promise to be truly extraordinary, as an unexpected and powerful coalition of conservatives, libertarians, new patriots, and principled Americans has formed to plan and oversee the events. The Tea Party Patriots recently released this announcement in preparation for the protests. In it, they explained that the operation now boasts the support of “partners at FreedomWorks, Institute for Liberty, the Ayn Rand Center, the National Taxpayers Union, and the Patrick Henry Center.” The intellectual diversity represented by these various groups, in particular with the inclusion of the notoriously atheistic and anti-Republican Ayn Rand Center, underscores the Tea Party’s commitment to fiscal responsibility, individual liberty, and government openness, rather than to any party lines or hidden agenda.

Perhaps even more impressively, the 912 protests of 2010 will have focal points in three separate cities: Washington, D.C., Sacramento, CA, and St. Louis, MO. The protests were big back in 2009 with just one central event, with about 75 thousand limited government advocates demonstrating on the streets of D.C., and tens of thousands more spread in various smaller cities across the nation. The Tea Party’s decision to expand into three cities this year shows confidence that their plans will be even more successful, possibly even reaching D.C.-sized demonstrations in each region of the States. This ambitious attitude likely stems not only from the large coalition of supporters which the Tea Party has built since 2009, but also from the mounting urgency of making a lasting impression on Congress and America before the mid-term elections 52 days later.

The 912 Project was created by Glenn Beck in March of 2009 to remind Americans of the core values like love of freedom, responsibility and accountability, and respect for God and fellow men that we all felt on the day after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Over the next several months, the project evolved as the aspects of accountability and freedom were amplified, until they spawned a nationwide taxpayer rally to get the government back to serving the interests of the people, rather than destroying wealth in the false name of American values. The taxpayers’ march on Washington on 9/12/2009 was unprecedented in its size, scope, and influence.

Now the Tea Party Patriots plan to do it all again by coordinating cross-country travel and organizing what could be one of the largest taxpayer demonstrations in the history of the world. Most major cities across the nation will have local events on the big day, but everyone is strongly encouraged to make travel plans to attend the marches in D.C., St. Louis, or Sacramento if at all possible. I will be heading to D.C. from the Raleigh-Durham area. Anyone who wants to join (and you really all should!) can subscribe to my blog by clicking the grey button in the upper-right corner of the screen. You will then receive email updates as I negotiate travel plans from Raleigh to D.C. When enough people are on board, the costs really will not be high, and of course the demonstration itself is free!

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Bob Etheridge assaulted civilians, but that’s what Congressmen always do.

June 15, 2010 Leave a comment

Congressman Bob Etheridge (D-NC) is taking a lot of heat right now. Watch the video and then listen to my take on this event.
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I respond in multiple parts:

The following links are relevant to the videos:

  • UPDATE: As of Tuesday the 15th, it’s official: MSNBC has decided to defend Etheridge’s assault on the grounds that the students being assaulted were probably Republicans. They have also determined that it is still unwise to manhandle someone, especially if you get caught.
  • The Guardian has joined MSNBC in explaining that the Congressman’s actions were not terrible and criminal due to the fact that the gentlemen pictured were almost certainly Republicans who knowingly disagreed with the Congressman and chose to breathe his air anyway.
  • The Washington Post has called the incident a  “gaffe”, declaring that it will not significantly affect Etheridge’s campaign for re-election and equating it with off-hand remarks made by Michelle Bachmann and Joe Wilson. That’s right, the Washington Post thinks that this is all about what Etheridge said, and not the fact that he physically attacked innocent young men.
  • The New York Times has decided today is a good day to remember why Republicans aren’t allowed to shove people.
  • Bob Etheridge assaults innocent civilians: the original video.
  • Bob Etheridge’s contact information.
  • Renee Elmers’ self-professed views.
  • Frank Deatrich makes it clear that the federal government’s policy of redistributing wealth and controlling lives is simply not okay through his answers to this questionnaire.

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